Slider
Slider

|

Slider

OPINION | Prayer, faith help 'Militant Mother' cope with vulnerabilities

Editorials & Columns
Typography
  • Smaller Small Medium Big Bigger
  • Default Helvetica Segoe Georgia Times

HAGÅTÑA — I am a "Militant Mother.”

This designation is claimed by many who have children with disabilities. As a group, we are the most opinionated and aggressive mothers on the planet, willing to move mountains to get the help our children need.

Although most of us do try to be polite, we can be difficult. Hell hath no fury like a Militant Mom who runs into a professional who gives a prognosis based on stereotypes (as in: “Your newborn will never walk or talk.”)

Because we Militant Moms are very vocal and forthright, we create the impression that we actually do know how to move those mountains. Those who watch us work think we can do anything.

But we can’t. As it turns out, our militancy is just the tip of the iceberg. Beneath the surface is a massive body of compassion, frustration, insecurity and hurt.

This was driven home to me last week when my special boy had a bad seizure.

He’s not had a good year. After being seizure-free for more than a year, he’s had one big seizure in five of the last eight months.

He made it through August and September without incident, but totally surprised me as the new month began.

Without warning, while putting on his shoes, he seized.

If you’ve never seen a grand mal seizure up close, it’s a most disturbing event. One minute, the kid is talking and laughing. The next, his eyes are rolled up into his head, his eyelids are fluttering, his limbs are stiff yet his body jumps, his head jerks spastically as the jaws and tongue click wildly.

It is obvious that the nervous system, which usually keeps body movements and responses organized with great precision, is short-circuiting. And the mountain-moving mother can do very little.

Nothing makes me feel more vulnerable than the fact that I can’t stop a seizure. Of course, I do have some strategies to get him through it, but those don’t shorten the event. It’s not over until it's over. And I pray throughout it will be soon.

Seizures are the height of helplessness for both the child and the mother.

And helplessness is weakening. But in our weakness, true help is found in the name of the Lord, who made heaven and earth.

He’s the One who can move mountains.

I pray that he soon does.

previous arrow
next arrow
Shadow
Slider

Read more articles

Visit our Facebook Page

previous arrow
next arrow
Shadow
Slider