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Homeless Russian sues ICE

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DENIS Uvarov is suing U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, alleging personal injury and demanding $80,000 in damages.

In his application to request to proceed in the District Court for the NMI without paying fees and costs, Uvarov said  he is homeless and is a citizen of the Russian Federation.

He said he arrived in the  CNMI on Nov. 29, 2017 and applied for political asylum at the local ICE office.

Uvarov, who represents himself, said he does not want to pursue his asylum application anymore.

Uvarov said on June 7, 2018, ICE confiscated his passport and “never [made] any effort in good faith [to] organize asylum interview.”

“When I needed to go home,  ICE was not able to return my passport,” he said.

He claimed that ICE violated a 1967 protocol on refugee rights.

This, he added, caused him mental harm, depression, and deprivation.

“I informed [ICE] of my wish to go home on July 10, 20[2]0. For the whole month I cannot get my passport back. The passport had been taken by ICE illegally because it is my identity document and this is Russian government property,” he said in his complaint.

Uvarov said he sent a notice addressed to the  Los Angeles Asylum Office, “but nobody has given back my passport.”

He added, “ICE is limiting my movement, making my travel outside CNMI impossible.”

He is asking the court to order ICE to return his passport.

He is also demanding $80,000 in compensation for his suffering and for punitive damages.

In a Jan. 2019 interview with Variety, Uvarov said he and his wife, Natalia Larina, fled St. Petersburg, Russia in Nov. 2017 “fearing persecution for attending political rallies and speaking publicly against Russian aggression in Ukraine.”

They said they had hoped to receive political asylum or refugee status in the CNMI, which is U.S. soil only to learn that under federal law no one in the Commonwealth is eligible to apply for asylum until Jan. 1, 2029.

They learned that they were  also ineligible for refugee status, which is only available to applicants located outside of the United States.

 

 

 

 

November 2020 pssnewsletter

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