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Warship sailor dies of Covid-19

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HAGÅTÑA (The Guam Daily Post) — The sailor assigned to the USS Theodore Roosevelt who was admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of U.S. Naval Hospital Guam on April 9 died of Covid-19-related complications on Monday, the Office of the Navy Chief of Information confirmed.

Seabees assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion coordinate transportation of sailors assigned to the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt who have tested negative for Covid-19 and are asymptomatic from Naval Base Guam to hotels on island. Sailors will be required to remain in quarantine in their assigned lodging for at least 14 days.

U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Nathan Carpenter


The name of the sailor is being withheld until 24 hours after next-of-kin notification.
According to the Navy, the sailor tested positive for Covid-19 on March 30, was removed from the ship and placed in an isolation house on Naval Base Guam with four other USS Theodore Roosevelt sailors. He received medical checks twice daily from Navy medical teams.
At approximately 8:30 a.m. on April 9, the sailor was found unresponsive during a daily medical check, the Navy stated. CPR was administered by fellow sailors and an onsite medical team. The sailor was in the ICU until he passed on Monday.
There have been 585 Covid-19 cases and more than 3,700 negative results following testing of the warship's sailors.
When the aircraft carrier pulled into port on Guam on March 27, the ship had several confirmed Covid-19 cases.
As of Monday, the Navy had announced that 92% of the USS Theodore Roosevelt crew of nearly 5,000 had been tested for Covid-19.
The aircraft carrier's former commander, Capt. Brett Crozier, had raised concern in a March 30 internal letter to the Navy leadership describing a worsening coronavirus outbreak aboard the warship.
“We are not at war. Sailors do not need to die. If we do not act now, we are failing to properly take care of our most trusted asset – our sailors,” Crozier wrote. “The spread of the disease is ongoing and accelerating.”
Crozier was relieved of duty but kept his rank and remains in the Navy.
National media reported that Crozier was among the sailors who tested positive for the virus. He's been reported to be in isolation at the Navy base on Guam along with the other sailors who have been afflicted with the respiratory disease.
Joint Region Marianas Commander Adm. John Menoni said Monday more than 4,000 of the aircraft carrier's sailors have been safely moved from the ship and are currently at controlled locations on Naval Base Guam and in quarantine-designated hotels in Tumon.
"Due to the hard work and dedication of our military and civilian teams over the past three weeks, we have completed this tremendous logistical challenge. Now we have the social distancing capacity needed for the health and recovery of the crew and we can more efficiently continue our next phase of the operation which includes deep cleaning and sanitization of the ship," said Menoni. "This virus is a serious enemy and it threatens to undermine both our mission and endanger all of us on Guam and in the CNMI. Working together will help us win this fight. If we don’t do the right thing, we’re endangering not only ourselves, but our neighbors, our families and the region."
Guam Gov. Lou Leon Guerrero issued a statement on the sailor's passing offering her deepest condolences.
"We live in uncertain times but Guam understands that every bit of freedom we enjoy is paid for by the men and women of the U.S.S. Theodore Roosevelt and others like them. Without a single weapon fired, the world is engaged in a costly struggle against a committed and relentless enemy. And, while we mourn for everyone we have lost in this fight, we promise their absence will not be vain. We wish him peace, eternal rest, and the knowledge that his loss touched thousands of people he has never met," said Leon Guerrero.

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